If you want to know the hottest bike style trending these days, you only need glance at the latest industry brochures or have a couple of swipes on the Instagram machine to get a clear picture: It's scramblers. Major manufacturers have dived in big time, with Ducati releasing four separate scrambler-themed models in 2018 alone. The marquee news from Indian this year was the release of its production FTR 1200 (a street tracker, but for our purposes worth a mention), and Triumph made a splash with its Scrambler 1200 XE and XC models.

And why not? The scrambler style is the visual embrace of fun and adventure, a do-it-all, no- worries machine that harkens back to a simpler time. Scramblers hit peak popularity (before the current surge) in the ’50s and ’60s, when standards were stripped and refitted with off-road-y bits.

What is a Scrambler Motorcycle?

Modern scramblers tend to pack a high pipe, knobby-ish tires, a robust suspension, and motocross or flat-track bars—though there’s still plenty of debate about what’s “authentic.” Most scramblers come with dual shocks, are powered by singles or twin-cylinder engines, and have minimalistic, simple lines.

Dig into the custom bike scene and scramblers and trackers dominate builds from Roland Sands to Rough Crafts to Deus and beyond. Fact is, customizers got there first, chopping road bikes down to the bone and fitting them with beefy shocks and chunky tires for more than a decade now.

It took a while, but the manufacturers finally took notice. Triumph was the first to roll out its Scrambler in 2006, but it wasn't until Ducati introduced its Scrambler line in 2014 that things really heated up; it's now the top-selling family in the Ducati range. BMW released the R nineT Scrambler in 2015 and it's also done well. Check out our comparison here.

With all that said, we thought we’d take a larger look at the scene and run down the production scramblers now available. We’ve listed the road-going models as well as some of their more capable off-road siblings and, at the end, a bunch of honorable mentions that include trackers and other misfits, all of which embody the good-times theme.

Benelli Leoncino Trail
Benelli Leoncino Trail
2018 Benelli Leoncino: $7,250 (approx.) Benelli

Benelli's current range of affordable midsize Chinese-made bikes are nothing like the exclusive superbikes the brand offered in the early aughties, but the lightweight, 500cc Leoncino (available in two versions) is still a representation of the rugged ethos. The scrambler-inspired 2018 Leoncino Trail comes complete with an upright riding position, long-travel suspension, stout brakes (with standard ABS), and chunky tires that are arguably a nod to the Ducati Scrambler 800. That pipe is still mounted a bit too low for any aggressive off-road antics, and the lack of a skid plate might give you pause, but it's an attractive, simple, and affordable scrambler option. Except for one important caveat—you can't get it in the US. At least not yet.

BMW R nineT Scrambler
BMW R nineT Scrambler
2019 BMW R NineT Scrambler: $12,995BMW

A hit for the Germans right out of the gate, the BMW Scrambler features a classic flat-twin engine for powerful torque and a unique sound. The R nineT Scrambler is fitted with the same 1,170cc air-and-oil-cooled opposed twin that can also be found in GS, R, and RT models, with an identical output of 110 hp and 86 pound-feet of torque, but it does have a revised fuel map as well as unique high-mount exhaust, and a nice assortment of other dirt-biased flourishes: slightly more suspension travel, rugged finishes, a more relaxed seating position, and a large 19-inch front wheel typical of scramblers. Non-scrambler bits include a monoshock, cast aluminum wheels, and street-biased rubber, though all these can be upgraded (for a price).

Ducati Scrambler Icon
Ducati Scrambler Icon
2019 Ducati Scrambler Icon: $9,395Ducati

Ducati brings a full line of 800cc scramblers, with the Scrambler Icon, Desert Sled, and Scrambler Full Throttle (we're not counting the Scrambler Café Racer for obvious reasons) fleshing out Ducati's most popular middleweight bikes. Bosch Cornering ABS now comes standard on all Scrambler 800 models, making them the only motorcycles in their class with such leading safety technology. Just so no one feels left out, Ducati offers two other displacements as well, with the bigger Scrambler 1100 and the baby, 400cc Sixty2, for a total of five scrambler options. Whew. The new Scrambler Icon starts at $9,395 and the Scrambler Full Throttle starts at $10,995. See more details in this video.

Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE
Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE
2019 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC/XE: $14,000/$15,400Triumph

With three scrambler variations in the mix, Triumph is right there nipping at Ducati's heels. Its 2019 Scrambler 1200 XC and XE are the bigger boys, boasting 1,200cc liquid-cooled parallel-twin motors designed to conquer urban lanes as well as dirty forest trails in classic British style. The top-of-the-range XE, which brings a host of robust off-road bits (like a longer-travel adjustable suspension, switchable ABS, and traction control), is intended for more dirt-minded riders, while the street-focused XC (still with a hint of off-road chops) is better geared toward paved environments. Both sport 21-inch front wheels, Brembo brakes with ABS, and selectable riding modes. Meanwhile, the smaller, street-oriented 900cc Street Scrambler also got major upgrades this year, like better suspension and a boost in horsepower, and is priced at $11,000.

Norton Atlas Ranger
Norton Atlas Ranger
2019 Norton Atlas Nomad/Atlas Ranger: $12,600/$15,150 (approx.)Norton

These new 650cc entries from the resurrected Norton marque bring strong scrambler chops and a sublime build quality that's sure to give established players like Triumph and Ducati a run for their money. Both Atlas models have a road-friendly but rugged vibe that references the 1960s, and both share an identical chassis and internals. The parallel-twin powerplant has four valves per cylinder, with two injectors per cylinder delivering fuel via fly-by-wire throttle bodies; output is a respectable 85 bhp at 11,000 rpm (claimed). The Atlas Nomad is the more naked and streetable of the two, while the Ranger piles on more dirtworthy bits like taller suspension, more aggressive rubber, a 19-inch front wheel, and a skid plate. Price is on the high side, but we're still stoked to see Norton back in the large-scale production game either way. You can get more info here.

Indian FTR 1200 S
Indian FTR 1200 S
2019 Indian FTR 1200/1200 S: $12,999/$16,000Indian Motorcycles

Yes, it's a street tracker, but it's also the bike that got everybody's tongues wagging last year. Indian's all-new beastmaster—er, 2019 FTR 1200—is based on the FTR750 dirt track racer, and looks to be Indian's highest-performing street motorcycle to date. A steel trellis space frame encloses the 1,200cc engine, which also acts as a stressed member. The riding position is upright and there's long-travel Sachs suspension (an inverted 43mm fork and a monoshock rear). The street tracker vibe comes courtesy of an 18-inch 10-spoke wheel out back with a 19-incher up front, both covered in flat-track-biased Dunlops designed for the FTR. Power is routed through a six-speed gearbox and chain final drive (flat track, ya know). Triple disc Brembo brakes and ABS are standard on both, but the up-spec FTR 1200 S brings fully adjustable suspension front and rear, and also comes equipped with Bosch stability control in addition to ABS. More info here.

Honorable Mentions

Husqvarna Svartpilen 701
Husqvarna Svartpilen 701
2019 Husqvarna Svartpilen 701: $11,999Husqvarna

Yep, another street tracker, but we did say we'd include those too. The Svartpilen 701 brings a slim profile built around the same liquid-cooled 692cc single-cylinder engine seen in its Vitpilen cousin, with a claimed peak of 75 hp and 53 pound-feet of torque. You'll also see a slipper clutch, ride-by-wire throttle, and, for suspension, a 43mm fork and a monoshock, both fully adjustable. A Brembo braking system slows the whoa, with 320mm dual discs at the front, a 240mm disc at the rear, and a Bosch switchable ABS system. Since this is a flat-track-inspired machine, off-road-style handlebars are fitted for an upright riding position.

Moto Guzzi V7II with Scrambler Kit
Moto Guzzi V7II with Scrambler Kit
Moto Guzzi Stornello/V7 II and III: N/AMoto Guzzi

Guzzi initially got into the modern scrambler game with the Stornello, which unfortunately was only offered for 2015–2017 in the US. If you're looking for more current scrambly-styled rigs from Italy's oldest brand, however, your best option would be to outfit one of its V7 models with a Guzzi-supplied scrambler kit. Truth be told, you could do worse; they don't look bad at all, with quality components and aesthetically sharp, premium materials. Scrambler kits for the V7 range have been in the catalog for years, and the integrated components—which include a high pipe option, beefier springs, and aluminum side plates—provide a good result. Pricing varies, so see Moto Guzzi for more info.

Honda Monkey
Honda Monkey
2019 Honda Monkey: $4,000Honda

Okay so we’re stretching it here just a tad, but let’s face it, the Grom-based, 125cc Monkey holds a lot of the key elements for hooning around in the dirt, like dual exposed shocks, knobby tires, high pipe, upright seating, and, of course, gobs of throwback vibes. There’s even an ABS option.

Honda CBSix50 Concept
Honda CBSix50 Concept
Honda CBSix50 ConceptHonda

Honda also did roll out a CBSix50 concept in Milan a couple of years ago, and that four-cylinder scrambler-ish machine also came with knobbies, spoked wheels, and motocross handlebars—but no high pipe. It didn’t make it to production, obviously, but who knows what the future holds…

2017 Yamaha SCR950
2017 Yamaha SCR950
Yamaha SCR950/XSR700 and 900: N/AYamaha

Some folks consider the XSR700 or 900 a tracker-style bike, and it certainly has potential, which folks like Kevin Murray are happy to exploit in builds like his Rural Racer. The Bolt-based Yamaha SCR950 though, was purpose-built for scrambling (sort of), with vintage-style paint, number plates, wire wheels, and off-road-style handlebar. It was powered by the Bolt's 942cc air-cooled V-twin, married to a five-speed transmission and rolled with the only belt drive we've seen among modern scrambler offerings. Unfortunately it's not in Yamaha's 2019 lineup, but for current models, the XSR looks like it's the most adaptable.

VanVan 200
Suzuki VanVan 200
Suzuki VanVan 200: $4,649Suzuki

Technically Suzuki doesn't offer a true scrambler, but for the same reasons we tagged the Monkey, we're including the VanVan 200. C'mon, the retro-styled, funky single-cylinder machine has compiled a growing cadre of admirers (us included). It definitely stands out from the crowd and punches well above its weight and class, even if the price feels a bit steep for an air-cooled single-cylinder displacing 199cc, with a drum rear brake. But the spirit is there, with appropriately oversize tires, high pipe, plenty of ground clearance, and a fully upright riding position. For more info visit suzukicycles.com.

H-D Street Rod 750 Customized
H-D Street Rod 750
Harley-Davidson Street Rod 750: N/AHarley-Davidson

Given its long history with flat track racing, it's surprising that Harley doesn't offer a production scrambler. But within the current lineup, the Street Rod 750's an obvious candidate. The engine is already at the heart of the XG750R flat track racer. So what's the deal?

That's what H-D international, based in Oxford, UK, thought, so it commissioned a local UK shop to outfit the 750 as a full flat tracker. Doing the dirty work was IDP Moto, who stripped off all the bike's standard street equipment – fenders, lights, front brake, muffler, ABS pump, rear seat and subframe, airbox and instruments – and got busy.

The original gas tank was reshaped, with two new slim panels now in place, instantly giving the Street Rod a racer profile as well as a hint of old-school XR750. High-rise Renthals add leverage, while adjustable Öhlins 907 rear shocks replaced the originals, and Avon Rain block pattern rubber went onto the standard aluminum rims for added traction. Down below, the V-twin's ECU was remapped to match the open 2-into-1 exhaust and Twin-Air foam filter, giving this baby an added snarl to go with the grunt.

As far we know, IDP is still making kits for the bike, so hit them up at www.idpmoto.com if you're interested. It's not quite a scrambler, but it's damn near close.

Even if you're not looking for a new, fully kitted scrambler, there are kits out there to help you recast your current ride, like this one from Hookie Co.