The New, More Powerful 2019 Ducati Diavel 1260 Is Here | Motorcycle Cruiser
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The New, More Powerful 2019 Ducati Diavel 1260 Is Here

Evolved for 2019, the unconventional power cruiser gets engine, chassis and electronic upgrades

In the wake of four new scramblers and an XDiavel update revealed at last month's Intermot show (and that’s not even counting the sporty models), we thought that just maybe Ducati might be done with unveils for the 2019 model year, but seems we were wrong. The Italians just announced, at the 2018 EICMA show in Milan, the new Diavel 1260.

2019 Ducati Diavel

The new 2019 Ducati Diavel expands on the original with a Testastretta DVT 1262 engine, improved suspension and an edgier profile.

Ducati

Which makes sense; the original, first-gen 2010 Diavel – the one that started Ducati's path into the modern cruiser world for real (please let’s not mention the short-lived, Virago-inducing Indiana) was getting long in the tooth and in need of a serious refresh, especially since the XDiavel was continuing to steal its thunder.

Ask and you shall receive, as they say, for here is the new 2019 Diavel 1260. Although Ducati says this next-gen Diavel stays faithful to the original sport-naked spirit of that first machine, it puts a decidedly more contemporary slant on it. For one there's a major makeover in the engine room, with the 2019 Diavel 1260 now powered by a Testastretta DVT (Desmodromic Variable Timing) 1262 engine, which claims an output of 159 hp at 9,500 rpm and 95 ft-lb. of torque at 7,500 rpm, compared to 152 hp and 91 ft-lb on the original 1198cc mill. Ducati also says the new motor offers a broader powerband thanks to the DVT, with more stump-pulling torque down low and well through the midrange, but still retaining that all-important top-end oomph. What's more, the motor is also a stressed member of the chassis.

48mm, fully-adjustable Ohlins inverted fork

The up-spec 1260 S model receives a 48mm, fully-adjustable Ohlins inverted fork as well as upgraded brakes and dedicated wheels.

Ducati

Speaking of the chassis, that’s also changed for 2019. But while the tubular steel trellis frame is new, that rear 17-inch wheel with its monstrous 240mm wide tire should look pretty familiar to any Ducatisti. The Diavel 1260 also gets an edgier silhouette, but Ducati says it left the mostly upright riding position and 'power cruiser' vibe that defined the first Diavel mainly unchanged.

That new chassis set-up is configured to make the Diavel 1260 more responsive, while a full suite of top-shelf rider aids and electronics, like Bosch Cornering ABS, deliver sportbike-level braking performance and better engine performance control.

Ducati Quick Shifter

Choose DTC, DWC and DPL as well as three ride modes on the full-color 3.5-inch TFT display. The S model comes with Ducati Quick Shifter as well. Read on for the translation.

Ducati

Part of that enhanced control is delivered via Ride by Wire throttle and a six-axis Bosch IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit), along with three readily accessible ride modes: Sport, Touring, and Urban, each of which delivers a unique (and adjustable) level of power output. Meanwhile, Ducati Traction Control (DTC), Ducati Wheelie Control (DWC), Ducati Power Launch (DPL), braking and cornering ABS, and of course, cruise control are available and programmable from the high-resolution TFT dash (and left handlebar switch).

1260 Diavel

The standard 1260 Diavel gets a 50mm upside-down fork and a Sachs rear shock.

Ducati

Naturally, there are two trim options available, the standard Diavel and the Diavel S. The regular version gets a fully-adjustable upside down 50mm Marzocchi fork and a Sachs rear shock as standard equipment, while the sportier Diavel S gets fully-adjustable Ohlins suspension at both ends, with a 48mm fully-adjustable Öhlins unit up front. The S model also gets dedicated wheels and radially-mounted Brembo monobloc M50 calipers operating on dual semi-floating 320mm rotors (Brembo M4.32 units are on the standard model). The Diavel S also gets a Ducati Quick Shifter (up and down) for clutchless shifting, as well as the Ducati Multimedia System (DMS) as standard equipment.

For both bikes, maintenance intervals have been extended too, so oil changes come every 9000 miles, with valve servicing every 18,000 miles. Prices and availability have yet to be announced, but we’re looking forward to a road test soon.